Health Can’t Wait: How Women are Building a Model for Universal Health Coverage Mar 23, 2017

“If you educate a woman, you educate her family, her community, and her entire country” — Malian proverb

Around the world, we face a crisis in maternal and child mortality. The evidence is staggering: Nearly 6 million children die before their fifth birthday and 300,000 women die from complications during pregnancy. Mali is at the epicenter of this crisis.

In 2015, Muso partnered with the Malian Ministry of Health on a Clinton Global Initiative commitment testing a new model for health coverage, in part by training groups of local Malians — primarily women — to provide lifesaving care in their communities.

To date, we’ve trained more than 400 community health workers and reached 300,000 people across Mali. I’m so proud to share a few images of these inspiring women at work:

In regions like Yirimadjo, Mali we’ve trained community health workers to conduct door-to-door home visits, proactively seeking patients. These women have become fixtures in their communities, providing crucial in-home medical services — from malaria treatment to prenatal consultations and preventive education — day in and day out. Read more.

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